> snoot
> 
> snoot snut, sb. dial. var. snout sb.1
> 
> 1. = snout sb.1 2. dial. and slang.
> 
>    * 1861 J. Barr Poems 33 Like harrow teeth they're stickin' out,
>      To catch the dirt below their snoot.
> 
>    * 1866 Galaxy 1 Oct. 277, I had supposed that such phrases as
>      `I'll mash your head!' `I'll bash you on the snoot!' `I'll mawl
>      yer jaws,' and similar expressive threats, were invented in the
>      New World.
> 
>    * 1884 E. W. Nye Baled Hay 209 Read our..`Ode to the Busted Snoot
>      of a Shattered Venus de Milo'.
> 
>    * 1905 G. H. Lorimer Old Gorgon Graham 220 Just as he got good
>      and ready to strike, I pasted him one in the snoot.
> 
>    * 1924 Wodehouse Bill the Conqueror v. 101 He seethed with
>      generous indignation and even went so far as to state his
>      intention..of busting the fellow one on the snoot.
> 
>    * 1938 D. Runyon Furthermore v. 86 A bust in the snoot.
> 
>    * 1956 D. M. Davin Sullen Bell ii. iv. 136 At first I was all for
>      poking the bloke in the snoot.
> 
>    * 1971 J. Aiken Nightly Deadshade iii. 33 Snell is sticking his
>      long snoot into the middle of things.
> 
> 2. The nose of an aircraft, esp. of adjustable construction (cf.
> droop-snoot s.v. droop sb. 3). Also, the nose of a car, etc.
> 
>    * 1945, etc. [see droop-snoot s.v. droop sb. 3].
> 
>    * 1962 New Scientist 18 Jan. 135/1 As the flaps are depressed, so
>      the snoot is tilted downwards until at full flaps it is
>      depressed at an angle of 35deg..
> 
>    * 1977 Drive Mar.-Apr. 52/3 Drivers are in a poor position to
>      judge the droop-snoot of the car.
> 
>    * 1980 A. Coppel Hastings Conspiracy iv. 32 Through the open door
>      of the flight-deck Brede could see that the snoot had been
>      lowered for better visibility.
> 
> 3. A tubular or conical attachment used to produce a narrow beam
> from a spotlight.
> 
>    * 1952 Cinema 7 Jan. 108/1 (Advt.), Viking Films Ltd... Lighting
>      equipment... Spots... Cans, bashers, overhead banks, snoots,
>      barndoors, diffusers, niggers, etc.
> 
>    * 1972 Quick & La Bau Handbk. Film Production xi. 73 Snoots
>      consist of metal tubes that are mounted on the front of
>      spotlights to control the spread of their beams.
> 
>    * 1977 J. Hedgecoe Photographer's Handbk. 34 Spotlight
>      accessories include folding barn-doors..and conical
>      snoots..both of which restrict the beam.


> snoot
> 
> snoot, v. U.S. f. prec.
> 
> 1. intr. = nose v. 8 b; = snout v. 2. (In quot. fig.) U.S. dial.
> rare.
> 
>    * 1890 Dialect Notes I. 75 Snoot (snt), of the human face or
>      nose, apparently the same word as snout. A vulgar word in New
>      England. `I'll bu'st your snoot'; `hit him on the snoot'. As a
>      verb in `to snoot round', i.e. to nose around, it is reported
>      from Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
> 
> 2. trans. To snub; to treat scornfully or with disdain. U.S.
> 
>    * 1928 E. Hatch Couple of Quick Ones iv. 198, I followed him..up
>      the street to where the Wright limousine was snooting the world
>      in general at the kerb.
> 
>    * 1939 J. P. Marquand Wickford Point xi. 124 Don't try to snoot
>      Sue Jaeckel.
> 
>    * 1959 V. Packard Status Seekers iii. 44 Many
>      intellectuals..develop their own ways of snooting.
> 
>    * 1977 Time 17 Jan. 28/3 Cinderella (Gemma Craven) gets snooted
>      by her Stepsisters and gazes sorrowfully into the flames of the
>      scullery fire.
Here's the output of a search for 'snoot' in all quoted text:
>   1.  bust (1963) Listener 28 Mar. 568/3 ``Protocol would hardly
>      permit him to..bust his interviewer one on that earnest
>      Canadian snoot of his.''
>   2.  droop (1945) N.Y. Times 5 Apr. 1/2 ``America's `droop-snoot'
>      bomber, a P-38 Lightning modified to lead standard P-38
>      formations in precision bombings. ''
>   3.  droop (1945) N.Y. Times, 5 Apr. 1/2 ``The `droop-snooter', a
>      fighter with a combined bombardier-navigator compartment added
>      in its nose ahead of the pilot's cockpit. ''
>   4.  droop (1955) Sci. News Let. 8 Oct. 230 ``Nose of the Fairey
>      Delta 2, a single-seat delta-wing research aircraft, can be
>      lowered, rather like a drawbridge, to give the pilot a good
>      forward view for landing, take-off and taxiing. `Droop-Snoot'
>      is the second British aircraft capable of supersonic speed in
>      level flight. ''
>   5.  droop (1962) New Scientist 18 Jan. 134 ``The `droop snoot'..is
>      virtually a false leading edge, hinged so that it can be tilted
>      downwards. ''
>   6.  droop (1969) Courier Mail (Brisbane) 21 May 1/5 ``Nicknamed
>      `Droop Snoots', the machines had been in communication with the
>      Apollo astronauts.''
>   7.  goofy (1951) S. Kaye-Smith Mrs Gailey 25 ``Two women..so
>      utterly unlike her friends-one snooty and the other goofy. ''
>   8.  right wing(1977) Listener 13 Jan. 60/4 ``Some people have
>      thought that your heroes are rather snooty and right-wingy and
>      so forth. ''
>   9.  shiner (1977) Daily Mirror 16 Mar. 3/5 ``Annie Walker,
>      Coronation Street's snooty landlady, is about to show up in the
>      snug..sporting a real shiner. But her black eye is not the
>      result of a well-rehearsed punch-up in the taproom.''
>  10.  single (1974) R. M. Strozier in Atlantic Monthly Mar. 44
>      ``When I visit the East Side singles bars, some of these
>      upper-class snooty girls look down on you. ''
>  11.  snoot (1861) J. Barr Poems 33 ``Like harrow teeth they're
>      stickin' out, To catch the dirt below their snoot. ''
>  12.  snoot (1866) Galaxy 1 Oct. 277, ``I had supposed that such
>      phrases as `I'll mash your head!' `I'll bash you on the snoot!'
>      `I'll mawl yer jaws,' and similar expressive threats, were
>      invented in the New World. ''
>  13.  snoot (1884) E. W. Nye Baled Hay 209 ``Read our..`Ode to the
>      Busted Snoot of a Shattered Venus de Milo'. ''
>  14.  snoot (1905) G. H. Lorimer Old Gorgon Graham 220 ``Just as he
>      got good and ready to strike, I pasted him one in the snoot.''
>  15.  snoot (1924) Wodehouse Bill the Conqueror v. 101 ``He seethed
>      with generous indignation and even went so far as to state his
>      intention..of busting the fellow one on the snoot. ''
>  16.  snoot (1938) D. Runyon Furthermore v. 86 ``A bust in the
>      snoot. ''
>  17.  snoot (1956) D. M. Davin Sullen Bell ii. iv. 136 ``At first I
>      was all for poking the bloke in the snoot. ''
>  18.  snoot (1971) J. Aiken Nightly Deadshade iii. 33 ``Snell is
>      sticking his long snoot into the middle of things.''
>  19.  snoot (1962) New Scientist 18 Jan. 135/1 ``As the flaps are
>      depressed, so the snoot is tilted downwards until at full flaps
>      it is depressed at an angle of 35°.. ''
>  20.  snoot (1977) Drive Mar.-Apr. 52/3 ``Drivers are in a poor
>      position to judge the droop-snoot of the car. ''
>  21.  snoot (1980) A. Coppel Hastings Conspiracy iv. 32 ``Through
>      the open door of the flight-deck Brede could see that the snoot
>      had been lowered for better visibility.''
>  22.  snoot (1952) Cinema 7 Jan. 108/1 (Advt.), ``Viking Films
>      Ltd... Lighting equipment... Spots... Cans, bashers, overhead
>      banks, snoots, barndoors, diffusers, niggers, etc. ''
>  23.  snoot (1972) Quick &. La Bau Handbk. Film Production xi. 73
>      ``Snoots consist of metal tubes that are mounted on the front
>      of spotlights to control the spread of their beams. ''
>  24.  snoot (1977) J. Hedgecoe Photographer's Handbk. 34 ``Spotlight
>      accessories include folding barn-doors..and conical
>      snoots..both of which restrict the beam.''
>  25.  snoot (1890) Dialect Notes I. 75 ``Snoot (sn.t), of the human
>      face or nose, apparently the same word as snout. A vulgar word
>      in New England. `I'll bu'st your snoot'; `hit him on the
>      snoot'. As a verb in `to snoot round', i.e. to nose around, it
>      is reported from Poughkeepsie, N.Y.''
>  26.  snoot (1928) E. Hatch Couple of Quick Ones iv. 198, ``I
>      followed him..up the street to where the Wright limousine was
>      snooting the world in general at the kerb. ''
>  27.  snoot (1939) J. P. Marquand Wickford Point xi. 124 ``Don't try
>      to snoot Sue Jaeckel. ''
>  28.  snoot (1959) V. Packard Status Seekers iii. 44 ``Many
>      intellectuals..develop their own ways of snooting. ''
>  29.  snoot (1977) Time 17 Jan. 28/3 ``Cinderella (Gemma Craven)
>      gets snooted by her Stepsisters and gazes sorrowfully into the
>      flames of the scullery fire.''
>  30.  snooter (1923) Wodehouse Inimit. Jeeves iii. 30 ``My Aunt
>      Agatha..wouldn't be on hand to snooter me for at least another
>      six weeks. ''
>  31.  snooter (1929) Wodehouse Mr. Mulliner Speaking viii. 286 ```As
>      far', replied Mr. Finch, frigidly, `as a bloke can be said to
>      be all right..who has been..chivvied and snootered and shot in
>      the fleshy part of the leg-.' ''
>  32.  snooter (1932) Wodehouse Let. 13 Aug. in Performing Flea
>      (1953) 66 ``Downtrodden young peer, much snootered by aunts,
>      etc., has become engaged to two girls at once.''
>  33.  snootful (1918) R. Lardner Real Dope 43 ``When somebodys else
>      husband pulls something its O.K. but if their own husband does
>      it he must of had a snoot full. ''
>  34.  snootful (1935) Wodehouse Luck of Bodkins xvii. 205 ``His
>      whole mind was manifestly intent on reaching the smoking-room
>      and getting a snootful. ''
>  35.  snootful (1953) W. R. Burnett Vanity Row xvi. 117 ``He was
>      drunk... `A snootful, eh?' ''
>  36.  snootful (1969) K. Vonnegut Slaughterhouse-Five ii. 40 ``Billy
>      didn't usually drink much..but he certainly had a snootful now.
>      ''
>  37.  snootful (1977) H. Greene FSO-1 xi. 103 ``Kim..had gotten a
>      snootful of the tear gas.''
>  38.  snootily (1940) G. Orwell Let. 16 Apr. in Coll. Essays (1968)
>      II. 22, ``I get quite a lot of letters..from people snootily
>      pointing out some mistake I've made. ''
>  39.  snootily (1954) Koestler Invisible Writing iii. xix. 220 ``And
>      now, when I am down, you snootily refuse to help me with my
>      business. ''
>  40.  snootily (1961) Guardian 29 Mar. 14/3 ``An old
>      lady..remarked..rather snootily..`It's where you were born that
>      counts.' ''
>  41.  snootily (1980) I. Hunter Malcolm Muggeridge ii. 36 ``Vidler
>      was unimpressed by all this and replied somewhat snootily,
>      rejecting all his arguments.''
>  42.  snootiness(1932) J. T. Farrell Young Lonigan iii. 124 ``She
>      said it served Helen right that she had gotten a crush on a guy
>      like Weary, because Weary would take some of the snootiness out
>      of her. ''
>  43.  snootiness(1942) R.A.F. Jrnl. 2 May 22 ``They in turn mistook
>      our English reserve for `snootiness'. ''
>  44.  snootiness(1956) S. Hope Diggers' Paradise 155 ``One or two
>      tourists I met were annoyed about what they described as this
>      `snootiness'. ''
>  45.  snootiness(1977) Sunday Times 15 May 40/1 ``All these books
>      steer with tact between the contrasting risks of sycophancy and
>      snootiness.''
>  46.  snooty (1919) A. Huxley Let. 12 Aug. (1969) 180 ``A very
>      snooty cousin and a sporty one. ''
>  47.  snooty (1922) S. Lewis Babbitt xx. 252, ``I didn't like..the
>      snooty way you talked. ''
>  48.  snooty (1931) E. Linklater Juan in Amer. ii. xvi. 172 ``She
>      says you were kinda snooty with her. Tried to high-hat her. ''
>  49.  snooty (1938) E. Bowen Death of Heart ii. vii. 303
>      ``Reproaches and rather snooty laughs were exchanged. ''
>  50.  snooty (1940) in Harrison &. Madge War begins at Home xiv. 379
>      ``They're quite snooty, because you don't buy anything else. ''
>  51.  snooty (1947) A. P. Gaskell in D. M. Davin N.Z. Short Stories
>      (1953) 282, ``I was lucky to have a girl like Betty who was
>      keen on football. Some of the girls used to go very snooty when
>      the blokes couldn't take them to the Friday-night hops. ''
>  52.  snooty (1955) E. Cadell Lark shall Sing v. 67 ``One of those
>      snooty little caf&eacu.s..run by bony gentlewomen. ''
>  53.  snooty (1959) I. &. P. Opie Lore &. Lang. Schoolch. x. 178 ``A
>      short-tempered person is spoken of as being..snappy, snooty
>      (meaning easily irritated), and sharp-edged. ''
>  54.  snooty (1960) O. Manning Great Fortune ii. 142 ``The English
>      wives were a bit snooty with me. ''
>  55.  snooty (1980) R. Barnard Death in Cold Climate vi. 60 ``You
>      know how the English can say `Really?'-all cold and snooty.''
>  56.  Sunday (1929) D. Runyon in Cosmopolitan Oct. 64/1 ``If you
>      argue with Dave the Dude too much he is apt to reach over and
>      lay his *Sunday punch on your snoot. ''