Mencken as quoted author
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 Found: 217 entries 
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   1.  adviser (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 242 ``Most English 
      universities have deans of faculties much like our own, and 
      some of them have lately laid in deans of women, and even 
      advisers to women students. '' 
   2.  Afro- (1944) H. L. Mencken in Amer. Speech XIX. 161 ``When the 
      New York Times announced in an editorial on March 7, 1930, that 
      it would capitalize the word Negro thereafter, there were loud 
      hosannahs from the Aframerican intelligentsia. '' 
   3.  ain't (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 146 ``Ain't is already 
      tolerably respectable in the first person..`ain't I in this?' 
      '' 
   4.  American (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) i. iii. 23 ``This 
      occasional tolerance for things American was never extended to 
      the American language.'' 
   5.  American (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 26 ``American thus shows 
      its character in a constant experimentation,..a steady reaching 
      out for new and vivid forms. '' 
   6.  Americanis(1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) i. i. 12 ``The 
      period from the gathering of the Revolution to the turn of the 
      century was one of immense activity in the concoction and 
      launching of new Americanisms, and more of them came into the 
      language than at any time between the earliest colonial days 
      and the rush to the West. '' 
   7.  Apache (1945) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 186 ``During 
      the [1914-18] war or soon afterward apache-dancers began to 
      appear in the United States. '' 
   8.  auto (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 110 ``Auto is almost unknown 
      [in England], and with it the verb to auto. '' 
   9.  beauty (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 573 
      ``Beauty-parlor began to appear before World War I, and soon 
      afterward it was displaced by beauty-shop. Sometimes the latter 
      is spelled beauty-shoppe, or even beaut&eacu.-shoppe. '' 
  10.  bee (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 561 ``The flea's 
      eyebrows, the bee's knees and the canary's tusks will be 
      recalled. '' 
  11.  best (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 236 ``What we call 
      the rib chops are [in England] the best end of the neck or best 
      end. '' 
  12.  biggie (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 338 ``It [sc. 
      Variety] converts all the other parts of speech into nouns, 
      e.g.,..pink (a sexy picture), clicky (a picture making money), 
      cheapie, biggie, brush-off and vocal (a song). '' 
  13.  bladder (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 159 ``Other 
      etymologists..have discerned German influences..in the common 
      use of Bladder as a derisory title for a small and bad 
      newspaper [cf. G. bl.tter newspapers]. '' 
  14.  blind (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. 731 ``*Blind 
      ad., an unsigned newspaper or magazine advertisement. '' 
  15.  blue sky (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. vii. 149 
      ``Carruth..suggested that blue-sky, to indicate a bad 
      investment, might be from the German blauer dunst.'' 
  16.  bogusness (1921) H. L. Mencken Prejudices 2nd Ser. i. ix. 79 
      ``The old bogusness hangs about them [sc. the intelligentsia], 
      as about the fashionable aristocrats of the society columns. '' 
  17.  boloney (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 391 ``Most English 
      newspapers...still spell bologna (sausage) balony. '' 
  18.  booboisie (1922) in Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4, 1946) xi. 560. 
  19.  booking (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 453 ``Punch's 
      theatre article used to be headed `Our Booking Office'. Today 
      everybody speaks and writes of the box-office of a theatre. 
      Only a railway ticket-office is a booking-office. '' 
  20.  Bostonese (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 179 ``The 
      educated speech of the State..is `untainted by Bostonese'.'' 
  21.  boulevard (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 546 ``Boulevard, 
      in some American cities, has of late taken on the meaning of a 
      highway for through traffic, on entering which all vehicles 
      must first halt. In England such a highway is commonly called 
      an arterial road. '' 
  22.  buckaroo (1946) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) iv. 152 ``Buckaroo 
      seems to have dropped out.'' 
  23.  bushwa (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 301 ``The 
      college boys and girls launched bushwah..and a number of other 
      thinly disguised shockers. '' 
  24.  -cade (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) v. ii. 180 ``In the 
      case of motorcade, autocade, camelcade and aerocade,..a new 
      suffix, -cade, seems to have come in.'' 
  25.  casting (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. ii. 704 
      ``Terms emanating from Hollywood wits..*casting-couch for the 
      divan in a casting-director's office. '' 
  26.  chamois (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 194 ``A large 
      number..give evidence of the American liking for short cuts in 
      speech, e.g...to chamois (or, perhaps more often, to shammy) 
      for to polish with chamois, to model for to act as a model. '' 
  27.  cheapie (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 338 ``It [sc. 
      Variety] converts all the other parts of speech into nouns, 
      e.g...clicky (a picture making money), cheapie, biggie, 
      brush-off and vocal (a song). '' 
  28.  chicken (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 220 ``The barbecues 
      which began to dot the country with the rise of the automobile 
      soon offered *chickenburgers as well as hamburgers. '' 
  29.  cigarette (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 361 ``The 
      English..are slow to follow American example in such forms as 
      cigaret and etiquet. '' 
  30.  clothing (1940) Mencken Happy Days 101 ``They made no more 
      impression upon him than if they had addressed a clothing-store 
      dummy. '' 
  31.  conch (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vii. iv. 378 ``The 
      inhabitants [at Key West] have invented the usual opprobrious 
      terms for one another, e.g., conch (a West Indian). '' 
  32.  congresswo(1946) H. L. Mencken in Amer. Speech XXI. 81 ``The 
      Hon. Clare Boothe Luce of Connecticut, the only congresswoman 
      who may be described plausibly as both cerebral and 
      beautiful.'' 
  33.  cook (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. 681 ``The 
      preparation of the opium is called cooking (or rolling) a 
      pill.'' 
  34.  coupe (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vii. 347, ``I 
      have..heard..coop for coup&eacu.. '' 
  35.  customize (1934) H. L. Mencken in Words Nov. 5/2 ``Obviously 
      American..are such curious forms as..to customize. '' 
  36.  cut (1941) H. L. Mencken Newspaper Days (1942) xi. 184 ``When 
      he got down his first dozen mugs..he cut loose with an exultant 
      yodel.'' 
  37.  cyclery (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 176 ``In Pasadena, 
      Calif.,..there is a hattery, in South Pasadena a cyclery.'' 
  38.  demolition(1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 289 ``In an 
      Atlanta department-store the News-Record 
      found..demolition-engineers who were once content to be 
      house-wreckers. '' 
  39.  demon (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 244 ``An 
      Englishman..never uses rum in the generic sense that it has 
      acquired in the United States, and knows nothing of 
      rum-hounds,..the rum-trade, and the rum-evil, or of the Demon 
      Rum. '' 
  40.  display (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. v. 160 ``Want-ad, 
      display-ad. '' 
  41.  don't (1919) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. vi. 210 ``Don't has 
      also completely displaced doesn't, which is very seldom heard. 
      `He don't' and `they don't' are practically universal. '' 
  42.  eastern (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang., Suppl. II. vii. iv. 128 
      ``On the Eastern Shore [of Maryland], south of the Choptank 
      river, the dialect shows the influence of Tidewater Virginia... 
      It is often difficult to say of a strange Eastern 
      Shoreman..whether he comes from below the Choptank or above.'' 
  43.  ecdysiast (1940) Mencken Let. 5 Apr. in Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 
      (1945) vi. vi. 585 ``It might be a good idea to relate 
      strip-teasing in some way..to the associated zo.logical 
      phenomenon of molting... A resort to the scientific name for 
      molting, which is ecdysis, produces both ecdysist and 
      ecdysiast. '' 
  44.  engineer (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. vi. 290 ``The 
      Engineering News-Record also discovered..a socio-religious 
      e[ngineer] (an uplifter), a social-e[ngineer] (the same),..a 
      human-e[ngineer] (another variety of psycho-analyst).'' 
  45.  -ette (1921) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 2) vi. 187 ``The 
      wide use of the suffix -ette in such terms as farmerette, 
      conductorette,..usherette and huskerette, is due to the same 
      effort to make one word do the work of two. '' 
  46.  F (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 272 ``A surgeon is 
      usually plain Mr., and prefers to be so called, though he may 
      have M.D. on his card, along with F.R.C.S. (fellow of the Royal 
      College of Surgeons). '' 
  47.  flannel (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. (1948) II. 486 
      ``Several English correspondents say that the English for 
      wash-rag is really flannel, but others deny it. '' 
  48.  flat (1963) Mencken Amer. Lang. xi. 731 ``Carnival workers, 
      and especially strong-joint or flat-joint operators, have a 
      more or less secret argot. '' 
  49.  floor (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. (Suppl. II) xi. 719 ``Of the 
      more original words and phrases of the truckmen I offer a few 
      specimens:-floor-boarding... Running at high speed. '' 
  50.  former (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. iv. 118 ``Such clumsy 
      quasi-titles as ex-United States Senator,..and former Chief of 
      the Fire Department. '' 
  51.  forward (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. ix. 302 ``The 
      *forward-looker, whose belief in the continuity..of the 
      evolutionary process takes on the virulence of a religious 
      faith. '' 
  52.  funeral (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 287 ``When it 
      [sc. the mortician's business] is achieved the patient is put 
      into a casket and stored in the reposing room or slumber-room 
      of a *funeral-home. '' 
  53.  Galgenhumo(1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 727 ``Not a 
      few of these terms show Galgenhumor, e.g., meat-wagon for an 
      ambulance. '' 
  54.  Geheimrat (1943) H. L. Mencken Heathen Days vii. 91 ``Thus a 
      plain Mister became Doctor, a Doctor became Professor, and a 
      Professor became Geheimrat. '' 
  55.  going (1916) H. L. Mencken Let. 10 July (1961) 85 ``You would 
      be a maniac not to go out for all that money while the going is 
      good. '' 
  56.  goof (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 682 ``A 
      sodium pentobarbital capsule is a goof-pill. '' 
  57.  goose-step(1923) H. L. Mencken Prejudices 3rd Ser. 10 ``The 
      most timorous, sniveling, poltroonish, ignominious mob of serfs 
      and goose-steppers ever gathered under one flag. '' 
  58.  goose-step(1923) H. L. Mencken Prejudices 49 ``The first made 
      them almost incapable of soldierly thought and conduct; the 
      second converted them into cringing goose-steppers. '' 
  59.  ground-hog(1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (Second Suppl.) xi. 
      713 ``A brakeman is a..ground-hog. '' 
  60.  ground-hog(1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. 718 ``A lineman's 
      helper..who never leaves the ground is a..groundhog. '' 
  61.  guest (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) xi. ii. 586 
      ``To guest, to appear as a guest. '' 
  62.  gunk (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 347 ``Gunk, a 
      self-emulsifying colloidal detergent solvent... Launched by the 
      Curran Corporation, Malden, Mass., in 1932. '' 
  63.  gunsel (1946) Mencken Amer. Lang. xi. 582 ``The tramp..carries 
      a boy with him, to rustle food for him and serve him 
      otherwise..the boy is a punk,..guntzel. '' 
  64.  gunsel (1946) Mencken Amer. Lang. 584 ``Gonov, which means a 
      thief to thieves, means a fool on the carnival lot, and the 
      same meaning is given to guntzel, which means, in the jungles, 
      the boy companion of a tramp.'' 
  65.  gutter (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. vi. 504 
      ``*Gutter-crawling is practised by mashers who run close to the 
      sidewalk, hoping to pick up light-headed girls. '' 
  66.  halfpenny (1908) H. L. Mencken Philos. Nietzsche 284 
      ``Reich..has attained the ha'penny celebrity he seems to crave 
      in much the same manner. '' 
  67.  hash (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 388 ``Of late 
      there has been a strong tendency..to omit the -ed ending... 
      Examples: mash potatoes, hash-brown potatoes, [etc.]. '' 
  68.  heavy (1963) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 730 ``Heavy 
      man, one transporting narcotics.'' 
  69.  hist (1919) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. iii. 91 ``They still 
      cling, in their common speech, to such forms as h'ist for 
      hoist. '' 
  70.  Hobson-Job(1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 41 ``Its variations show 
      a familiar effort to bring a new and strange word into harmony 
      with the language-an effort arising from what philologists call 
      the law of Hobson-Jobson. '' 
  71.  honey (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. vii. 125 
      ``Southern speech has suffered cruelly on the stage and in 
      talkies, where kittenish actresses from the domain of General 
      American think that they have imitated it sufficiently when 
      they have thrown in a few you-alls and honey-chiles. '' 
  72.  hot-foot (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 392 ``The 
      Army also discourages the old soldiers' game of hot-foot, which 
      consists in inserting matches between the soles and uppers of a 
      sleeping comrade's shoes, and then lighting them. '' 
  73.  hully gee (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 664 ``Hully gee 
      (for Holy Jesus) was introduced by Edward W. Townsend's Chimmie 
      Fadden and Major Max (New York, 1895), but it disappeared with 
      the decay of the Bowery boy as an American comic type.'' 
  74.  hummer (1963) Mencken Amer. Lang. xi. 730 ``Hummer, any kind 
      of charge placed against a suspect so that he can be held 
      although there is insufficient evidence to hold him on the 
      charge for which he is really wanted.'' 
  75.  idem sonan(1919) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. viii. 273 ``In 
      America, with a language of peculiar vowel sounds and even 
      consonant&dubh.sounds struggling against a foreign invasion 
      unmatched for strength or variety..the legal rule of idem 
      sonans is of much wider utility than anywhere else in the 
      world.'' 
  76.  Inc (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 244 ``An Englishman 
      writes Ltd. after the name of a limited liability (what we 
      would call incorporated) bank or trading company, as we write 
      Inc. '' 
  77.  Indiana (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 616 ``An aged 
      Indiana poetaster named John Finley. '' 
  78.  Indianian (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. (Suppl.) II. 620 
      ``Hoosier, at the start, did not signify an Indianan 
      particularly, but any rough fellow of what was then the wild 
      West.'' 
  79.  indoctrina(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 306 ``The reds 
      who emerged from hiding on the establishment of the entente 
      cordiale with Russia in 1940..have revived and propagated..to 
      indoctrinate, [etc.]. '' 
  80.  infant-sch(1921) Mencken Amer. Lang. (rev. ed.) 120 ``An 
      English boy whose father is unable to pay for his education 
      goes first into a babies' class..in a primary or infants' 
      school. '' 
  81.  inshoot (1940) H. L. Mencken Happy Days 230 ``When I ventured 
      on an inshoot it was apt to be recovered, not by the catcher, 
      but by the third baseman.'' 
  82.  jit (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 296 ``For Negro..jit.'' 
  83.  kike (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 115 ``An Englishman..knows 
      nothing of our common terms of disparagement, such as kike..and 
      rube. '' 
  84.  kinker (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 684 ``A 
      contortionist is a frog, bender or Limber Jim, a freak or 
      snake-charmer is a geek, and all performers are kinkers.'' 
  85.  kishke (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 217 ``In New York 
      City the high density of Eastern Jews in the population has 
      made almost every New Yorker familiar with a long list of 
      Yiddish words e.g.,..kishkes, kittl, [etc.]. '' 
  86.  knowledgea(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 423 ``The 
      English have many counter-words that fail to make the Atlantic 
      journey, e.g., knowledgeable. '' 
  87.  Kriss Krin(1919) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. iii. 89 ``Another 
      example of debased German is offered by the American Kriss 
      Kringle. It is from Christkindlein, or Christkind'l, and 
      properly designates, of course, not the patron saint of 
      Christmas, but the child in the manger. A German friend tells 
      me that the form Kriss Kringle, which is that given in the 
      Standard Dictionary, and the form Krisking'l, which is that 
      most commonly used in the United States, are both quite unknown 
      in Germany. '' 
  88.  lasso (1940) H. L. Mencken Happy Days 284 ``They lay in wait 
      in dark Greene street with their..lassos, and knives. '' 
  89.  Lawd (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 664 ``Euphemisms... 
      For Lord: land, law, lawks, lawdy, lawsy. '' 
  90.  legger (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 366 ``But of more 
      interest..are the words showing recent vogue affixes, 
      e.g...-legger, as in bootlegger and meatlegger. '' 
  91.  lepper (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 362 ``Among 
      American horse fanciers a jumping horse is called a lepper.'' 
  92.  listen (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 317 ``It has been 
      suggested ..that it listens well may be from es h.rt sich gut 
      an.'' 
  93.  lovey-dove(1946) H. L. Mencken in Life 5 Aug. 46/2 ``And bring 
      in a reign of peace, prosperity and lovey-dovey.'' 
  94.  lush (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 682 ``A creep-joint 
      or panel-house is one in which patrons are robbed, a roller or 
      mush-worker is a girl who robs them, and a lush-worker is one 
      who specializes in drunks. '' 
  95.  mad ( 1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 80 ``In the familiar simile, 
      as mad as a hornet, it [sc. the word mad] is used in the 
      American sense. '' 
  96.  manifest (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 582 ``A fast 
      freight is a manifest or red-ball. '' 
  97.  many (1941) H. L. Mencken Newspaper Days (1942) xii. 193 ``The 
      poor old man..nursing a hangover from a Bar Association 
      banquet, had thrown in one too many quick ones, and so got 
      himself plastered. '' 
  98.  marriage (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 475/1 ``Marriage 
      lines is confined to the vulgar. On higher levels marriage 
      certificate is used. '' 
  99.  matte (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 699 ``Matte shot, 
      a film made with a section blocked out, to be filled later on 
      another set. '' 
 100.  me (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) ix. 457 ``Him and me are 
      friends. '' 

   1.  measle (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 383 ``False 
      singulars, made by back formation, are numerous, e.g.,..measle, 
      nor are they confined to the untutored.'' 
   2.  metro (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 110 ``In England..a subway is 
      always a tube, or the underground, or the Metro. '' 
   3.  mezzo-brow(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 325 ``The 
      search for a term to designate persons neither high-brows nor 
      low-brows has led to the suggestion of mizzen-brow and 
      mezzo-brow..but they have not caught on.'' 
   4.  mill (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 717 ``Writers' 
      cramp was cured..on the advent of the mill, i.e., the 
      typewriter.'' 
   5.  mill (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 724 ``There are 
      others [sc. new terms] that remain the private property of the 
      men working in automobile plants and of those who sell or 
      repair cars. A few specimens; Bald-head. A worn tire... Mill. 
      An engine [etc.]. '' 
   6.  Milton (1922) H. L. Mencken Prejudices (1923) 3rd Ser. iii. 89 
      ``A genuine artist..would have thoughts and feelings of his 
      own, and the impulse to give them objective form would be 
      irresistible... There are no mute inglorious Miltons, save in 
      the hallucinations of poets. The one sound test of a Milton is 
      that he functions as a Milton. '' 
   7.  miss (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 124 ``The vulgar 
      American misuse of..Mis' (pro. miz) for Mrs...was so widespread 
      by 1790 that..Webster denounced it as `a gross impropriety'... 
      It survives unscathed in the speech of the common people. '' 
   8.  mission (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 676 ``At the 
      bottom of the pile are the poor wretches..who..gravitate 
      dismally toward the big cities, to become beggars and 
      mission-stiffs.'' 
   9.  Missourian(1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. vii. 173 ``D. 
      S. Crumb..unearthed a great deal more that was specially 
      Missourian, e.g...buckshot land, poor clay soil. '' 
  10.  moisturize(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 402 ``Verbs 
      made of common nouns:..to moistureize. '' 
  11.  moke (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 635 ``Moke was 
      thrown into competition with coon in 1899 by the success of 
      `Smokey Mokes', a popular song by Holzmann and Lind.'' 
  12.  Mormon (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 640 ``Utah calls 
      itself the Beehive State,..but the designation Mormon State is 
      far more popular, and seems likely to stick. '' 
  13.  moss (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. 742 
      ``Mosshorn, an old steer; also, an old cowboy. '' 
  14.  multip (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. 756 ``Primip, 
      a mother having her first child... At subsequent deliveries she 
      is a multip,..or a para-two, three, etc. '' 
  15.  murder (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 707 ``The 
      vocabulary of the jazz addict is largely identical with that of 
      the jazz performer...anything excellent is killer-diller, 
      murder or Dracula. '' 
  16.  naughty (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 228 ``The child behaved 
      naughty. '' 
  17.  navy (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 239 ``What we call..a 
      navy-yard is a dock-yard or naval-yard. '' 
  18.  near (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 159 ``Many characteristic 
      Americanisms of the sort to stagger lexicographers-for example, 
      near-silk-have come from the Jews. '' 
  19.  necker (1923) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 3) 373 ``Necker, one 
      given to cheek-to-cheek dancing. '' 
  20.  Negrophobi(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 408 ``Whenever 
      a new suffix appears in the United States, it is put to use. An 
      example is..-phobia, borrowed from the psychiatrists, and made 
      to do heavy duty in a multitude of nouns designating violent 
      aversions e.g.,..negrophobia..with attendant adjectives in 
      -phobic.'' 
  21.  net (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) v. 199 ``The 
      favorite verbs of the newspaper copy-desk are those of three 
      letters, e.g., to air,..to net. '' 
  22.  New Englan(1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 198 ``Dr. R-M. 
      S. Heffner, who was born in 1892 at Bellefontaine, in the west 
      central part of the State [sc. Ohio], testifies that New 
      Englandisms were common there in his boyhood.'' 
  23.  Nietzschea(1908) H. L. Mencken Philos. Nietzsche iii. ii. 278 
      ``We have a hero who calls himself a dionysian and offers 
      Nietzscheism as a substitute for Christianity. '' 
  24.  nigger (1940) H. L. Mencken Happy Days 43 ``Sometimes a 
      black-hearted boy would sneak into the adjacent brickyard, 
      which was covered in large part with Jimpson weeds, plantains 
      and other such vegetable outlaws, and return with a large ball 
      of nigger-lice. '' 
  25.  night (1913) H. L. Mencken Let. 17 Aug. (1961) 32 ``The title 
      `Night Life in Vienna'..has the air of a lure held out to the 
      Puritanical and dirty-minded. '' 
  26.  nisei (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 608 ``The 
      designation nisei..for Japanese of American birth was seldom 
      heard, before Pearl Harbor, save on the Pacific Coast... Nisei 
      is sometimes spelled nissei. '' 
  27.  nothing (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. ix. 392 
      ``There may not be no nothing. '' 
  28.  ofay (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) v. 214 ``The word 
      ofay, which may have come from the French au fait (signifying 
      mastery), is in general use in the Negro press of the United 
      States to designate a white person. '' 
  29.  oiler (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 714 ``A tank-car 
      is a car or oiler. '' 
  30.  okay (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 161 ``Dr. Woodrow Wilson is 
      said..to use okeh in endorsing government papers. '' 
  31.  old (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 604 ``Maryland Free 
      State...has overshadowed all the old nicknames..including Old 
      Line State and Terrapin State. '' 
  32.  one (1941) H. L. Mencken Newspaper Days (1942) xvi. 245 ``His 
      father had been, at one and the same time, a Confederate 
      general, a French nobleman, and a graduate of both Oxford and 
      Cambridge. '' 
  33.  orphan (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 724 ``Orphan, or 
      off-breed, an obsolete model. '' 
  34.  outfit (1943) H. L. Mencken Heathen Days vii. 89, ``I was 
      presently playing trios and quartettes with an outfit that 
      devoted four hours of every week to the job. '' 
  35.  overage (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 366 ``Overage (a 
      bank term: the opposite of a shortage). '' 
  36.  paddle (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 727 ``The 
      airmen..use many derisory terms in speaking of 
      themselves..e.g.,..paddlefoot..for a member of the ground crew. 
      '' 
  37.  pale-face (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 637 ``The 
      Negroes use various other sportive terms for whites, e.g., 
      pale-face, chalk and milk. '' 
  38.  pass (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 105 ``His [sc. an English 
      university man's] daily speech is full of terms unintelligible 
      to an American student, for example, wrangler, tripos, head, 
      pass-degree and don. '' 
  39.  peck horn (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 705 ``It [sc. 
      jive] arose in the honky-tonks and tingle-tangles of the 
      pre-jazz era, and many of its current names for musical 
      instruments go back to that era or even beyond, e.g.,..pretzel 
      or peck&dubh.horn for a French horn. '' 
  40.  percentage(1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 766 
      ``Percentage man. A news photographer who makes a large number 
      of exposures, hoping that chance will give him a few good 
      pictures. '' 
  41.  perk (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) v. 192 ``To perc (to 
      make coffee in a percolator). '' 
  42.  Pete (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 668 ``Among the 
      cant terms of the jug-heavies are..soup or pete, 
      nitroglycerine.'' 
  43.  pie (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 678 ``Pie-card, a 
      union card used as a credential in begging. '' 
  44.  pissoir (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 127 ``The French 
      pissoir..is still regarded as indecent in America, and is 
      seldom used in England, but it has gone into most of the 
      Continental languages. '' 
  45.  pitcher (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vii. 352 ``On the 
      vulgar level amateur is always amachoor, and picture is pitchur 
      or pitcher. '' 
  46.  place (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 248 ``We speak of 
      backing a horse to win, place or show; the Englishman uses each 
      way instead, meaning win or place, for place, in England, means 
      both second and third. '' 
  47.  plug (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. xi. 739 
      ``Plug, a good book that no one wants. '' 
  48.  Polish-Ame(1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 673 ``The 
      Polish-American journalists are rather more careful than most. 
      '' 
  49.  potman (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 243 ``Barmaids do 
      the work, with maybe a barman, potman or cellarman to help. '' 
  50.  pot-pie (1940) Mencken Happy Days iv. 59 ``The Rennert [Hotel] 
      also offered an oyster pot-pie that had its points. '' 
  51.  potsy (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 750 ``Potsy, a 
      fireman's badge. '' 
  52.  powder-roo(1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 640 ``During 
      the days of Prohibition some learned speak-easy proprietor in 
      New York hit upon the happy device of calling his retiring-room 
      for female boozers a powder-room. '' 
  53.  premiere (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 387 ``A few of 
      its [sc. Variety's] characteristic inventions will suffice:..to 
      premier (often shortened to to preem). '' 
  54.  printery (1921) Mencken Amer. Lang. (rev. ed.) 187 
      ``Printery..appeared very early, and..has been reinforced by 
      many analogues, e.g., beanery, bootery [etc.]. '' 
  55.  process (1945) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 417 ``To 
      process, now threatens to take its place in the language 
      alongside to contact... The New Dealers gave it a much wider 
      range..widening it to include human beings among its objects. 
      It has since been adopted..both in its older sense of doing 
      something to inanimate materials and in its new sense of 
      mauling and manipulating God's creatures. '' 
  56.  propaganda(1949) H. L. Mencken in Philologica: Malone 
      Anniversary Stud. 317 ``There is..a desire to get rid of 
      circumlocution and the waste of words, as in..to propaganda, to 
      steam-roller, to belly-ache.'' 
  57.  pusher (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 681 ``A 
      marihuana smoker is a viper..and a peddler is a pusher. '' 
  58.  put (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 449 ``He [sc. C. T. 
      Onions in 1936] noted that to put it across, to get it across, 
      and to put it over were already `firmly domiciled' in 
      England... They really got their vogue in the United States as 
      baseball terms. '' 
  59.  put (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 191 ``The history of 
      baseball terms also deserves to be investigated, for many of 
      them have entered the common speech of the country, e.g...to 
      put it (or one) across (or over). '' 
  60.  quaker (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 598 ``State 
      nicknames..of Pennsylvania... Quaker State. '' 
  61.  raise (1921) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (1922) iv. 131 ``When 
      her wages are increased she does not get a raise, but a rise. 
      '' 
  62.  Rastus (1944) H. L. Mencken in Amer. Speech XIX. 172 ``In my 
      boyhood Cuffy had disappeared and Sambo was being supplanted by 
      Rastus. '' 
  63.  rat race (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 707 ``The 
      vocabulary of the jazz addict... A dance is a rat-race or 
      cement-mixer.'' 
  64.  regular (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 254 ``When G. 
      K. Chesterton made his first visit to the United States he was 
      much upset when an admiring reporter described him as a regular 
      guy. '' 
  65.  remain (1938) H. L. Mencken Let. 23 Apr. (1961) 427 ``Whether 
      I'll write anything for publication remains to be seen. '' 
  66.  rep (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 690 ``Rep 
      company, a company presenting a r&eacu.pertoire of plays on the 
      road. '' 
  67.  repossesse(1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vi. 293 
      ``For the former [sc. second-hand] the automobile dealers..have 
      substituted reconditioned, rebuilt, repossessed and used. '' 
  68.  reune (1949) Mencken in Kirby &. Woolf Philologica 316 ``The 
      embryologist of speech discerns several processes in the making 
      of such novelties [sc. new verbs]. Some are simply nouns 
      unchanged, e.g., to contact..others are back-formations from 
      nouns, e.g., to locate, to enthuse, to reune.'' 
  69.  rinse (1919) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. iii. 91 ``The 
      Yankees..still clung, in their common speech, to such forms 
      as..rench for rinse,..and the employment of precisely the same 
      forms by thousands of Irish immigrants..gave them a certain 
      support.'' 
  70.  rotisserie(1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 215 
      ``R.tisserie, with the accent omitted, seems to be an 
      Americanism. It signifies an eating-house wherein chickens and 
      butcher's meat are roasted at a charcoal-grill, usually in the 
      show-window of the establishment.'' 
  71.  roustabout(1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 763 
      ``Roustabout, a laborer on an oil lease, not a member of the 
      rig crew. '' 
  72.  run (1956) H. L. Mencken Minority Rep. 206 ``Why assume so 
      glibly that the God who presumably created the universe is 
      still running it? '' 
  73.  salesman (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 588 ``American 
      milk-wagon drivers are called milk-salesmen and bakers' 
      deliverymen bread-salesmen. '' 
  74.  Salisbury (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 429 ``During 
      World War I an effort was made by super-patriots to drive all 
      German loans from the American vocabulary. Sauerkraut became 
      liberty cabbage, hamburger steak became Salisbury steak. '' 
  75.  salon (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 706 ``A performer 
      who..undertakes conventional music is a commercial, salon-man, 
      long-underwear or long-hair. '' 
  76.  sandwich (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 580 ``Eat shop, 
      *sandwich shop. '' 
  77.  save (1941) Mencken in New Yorker 24 May 22/1 ``He might very 
      well have saved his wind, for Bill soon had him. '' 
  78.  schnook (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 757 
      ``Schnuck.., a customer easily persuaded, a sucker. '' 
  79.  scofflaw (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 174 ``The 
      announcement that scofflaw..had won was made on Jan. 15, 1924. 
      The word came into immediate currency, and survived until the 
      collapse of Prohibition. '' 
  80.  self (1949) H. L. Mencken in Kirby &. Woolf Philologica 316 
      ``So far I have heard of no verb made of what appears to be a 
      pronoun save to self. '' 
  81.  sepia (1944) H. L. Mencken in Amer. Speech XIX. 166 ``Some of 
      them also use such terms as..sepia to get away from 
      the..inaccurate black, and in 1944 there was a Sepia Miss 
      America contest. '' 
  82.  sheep (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 262 ``Many generic 
      names for alcoholic stimulants..sheep-dip, [etc.]. '' 
  83.  shellac (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 644 ``When 
      a novelty is obvious it seldom lasts very long, e.g., 
      shellacked for drunk.'' 
  84.  shoo-fly (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 311 ``Shoo-fly afflicted 
      the American people for at least two years, and `I don't think' 
      and aber nit quite as long.'' 
  85.  short (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 667 ``Short-con 
      workers operate on a modest scale, and are usually content with 
      whatever money the victim has on him at the time he is rooked. 
      '' 
  86.  showcase (1945) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 387 ``A 
      few of its [sc. Variety's] characteristic inventions will 
      suffice: to ash-can, to angel, to showcase [etc.]. '' 
  87.  sit (1943) H. L. Mencken Heathen Days vii. 91 ``Once, when a 
      baron sat in for a few sessions, we called him Count. '' 
  88.  sitter (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 682 ``Women 
      who frequent taverns or night-clubs, getting a percentage on 
      the drinks they induce male patrons to buy, are..sitters.'' 
  89.  slave-driv(1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 674 
      ``The [prison] guards are shields, screws,..slave-drivers or 
      herders. '' 
  90.  sleep (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. i. 24 ``A sleeping-car sleeps 
      thirty passengers. '' 
  91.  smut (1927) H. L. Mencken Let. 2 Dec. (1961) 305 ``Of my 
      inventions I am vainest of Bible Belt, booboisie, smut-hound 
      and Boobus americanus. '' 
  92.  someplace (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 394 
      ``The long-awaited grammarian of vulgar American..will have a 
      gaudy time anatomizing such forms as..`It was some place else', 
      [etc.]. '' 
  93.  spit (1949) H. L. Mencken Mencken Chrestomathy xxx. 626 `` Is 
      it hot in the rolling-mill? Are the hours long? Is &dollar.15 a 
      day not enough? Then escape is very easy. Simply throw up your 
      job, spit on your hands, and write another `Rosenkavalier'. '' 
  94.  split (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 691 ``Split 
      week, a week on the road divided between two or more towns. '' 
  95.  spritz (1948) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. 202 ``Spritz, to 
      sprinkle or squirt. '' 
  96.  store (1948) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. II. x. 591 ``A 
      store-church is one set up in a vacant store or in the front 
      room of a dwelling house. '' 
  97.  style (1924) H. L. Mencken Let. 7 Dec. (1961) 272 ``Have you 
      such a thing as a *Style Sheet for The Atlantic? '' 
  98.  style (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 194 ``The 
      American liking for short cuts in speech, e.g...to style for to 
      cut in accord with the style. '' 
  99.  tar (1944) H. L. Mencken in Amer. Speech XIX. 174 ``Pickaninny 
      was..used..affectionately. So..was tar-pot..signifying a Negro 
      child. '' 
 100.  technic (1943) H. L. Mencken Heathen Days vii. 93 ``The 
      Fourth..went even worse than the Eroica, though it actually 
      makes much less demand on technic. '' 

   1.  tend (1956) H. L. Mencken Minority Report 251 ``Unfortunately, 
      the machine thus devised to halt heresy also tends to halt 
      progress. '' 
   2.  terp (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 338 ``It [sc. 
      Variety] makes verbs of nouns, e.g...to preem and to terp. '' 
   3.  thanx (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) viii. 406 
      ``Such forms as burlesk..thanx and kreem..are used freely by 
      the advertising writers. '' 
   4.  toe (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 324 ``So many 
      novelties swarm in... A large number come and go without the 
      lexicographers so much as hearing of them... At least 
      four-fifths of those which get any sort of toe-hold in the 
      language originate in the United States. '' 
   5.  Turk (1945) Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 603 ``Turk is used 
      among Roman Catholic priests in the United States to designate 
      a colleague of Irish birth. '' 
   6.  walk-up (1919) Mencken Amr. Lang. iv. 110 ``The term flat `is 
      usually in the United States restricted to apartments in houses 
      having no elevator or hall service'. In New York such 
      apartments are commonly called walk-up apartments. '' 
   7.  wanderlust(1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 219 
      ``Wanderlust..is used much more frequently in the United States 
      along with its derivatives, wanderluster (Eng. rambler), 
      wanderlusting and wanderlust-club. '' 
   8.  want (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. 160 ``Ad-writer, want-ad,..and 
      ad-man, are already accepted in technical terminology. '' 
   9.  way (1935) H. L. Mencken Let. 4 Jan. (1961) 386 ``You must yet 
      go a long way, of course, before you are eligible to it. '' 
  10.  western (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) vii. 358 ``The 
      chief characters of Western, or General American and of New 
      England and Southern American have been indicated. '' 
  11.  while (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) 209 ``Q-room.., 
      While-U-wait, and Bar-B-Q.., all of them familiar signs. '' 
  12.  Winnipeg (1936) Mencken Amer. Lang. (ed. 4) x. 549 
      ``Richmonder, Winnipegger, Montrealer, Lynner. '' 
  13.  wisenheime(1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. v. 151 ``Several years 
      ago -heimer had a great vogue in slang, and was rapidly done to 
      death. But wiseheimer remains in colloquial use as a facetious 
      synonym for smart-aleck, and after awhile it may gradually 
      acquire dignity. '' 
  14.  woman (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. iv. 121 ``*Women's wear, in 
      English shops, is always ladies' wear. '' 
  15.  yen (1919) Mencken Amer. Lang. iii. 93 ``A great many of them 
      [sc. Chinese words] have remained California localisms, among 
      them such verbs as to yen (to desire strongly, as a Chinaman 
      desires opium). '' 
  16.  youthify (1945) H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. 573 
      ``Beauty-parlor..was displaced by beauty-shop... The girls have 
      produced a considerable vocabulary of elegant terms to 
      designate their operations, e.g. to youthify. '' 
  17.  zombie (1936) H. L. Mencken Amer. Language (ed. 4) xi. 587 
      ``Any performer [in a film] not a Caucasian is a zombie. ''