(Only the first 100 quotations are shown)
> Found: 3096 entries
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>   1.  A (1914) Times 16 Feb. 6/2 ``Since the inception of the board
>      [British Board of Film Censors]..627 have been passed for
>      `public' exhibition with the `*A' certificate. ''
>   2.  A (1914) Times Book of Navy 145 ``The abbreviations used in
>      the lists are as follows:..*A.A., Anti-air-craft guns. ''
>   3.  A (1914) W. S. Churchill in M. Gilbert Winston S. Churchill
>      (1972) III. Compan. i. 185 ``A.G., R.M. will make arrangements
>      for their reception in the camps. ''
>   4.  aa (1914), (1920) [see block sb. 23, block lava].
>   5.  abaxial (1914) M. Drummond tr. Haberlandt's Physiol. Plant
>      Anat. vi. 289 ``The presence of the last-mentioned layer [in
>      the leaf] illustrates a tendency on the part of the plant to
>      extend the photosynthetic system beyond its ordinary limits,
>      wherever illumination provides an opportunity. Such an abaxial
>      palisade-layer..constitutes, as it were, a miniature copy of
>      the principal adaxial system. ''
>   6.  above (1914) Joyce Dubliners 221 ``He was undecided about the
>      lines from Robert Browning for he feared they would be above
>      the heads of his hearers. ''
>   7.  absolute (1914) A. S. Eddington Stellar Movements viii. 170
>      ``Absolute magnitudes (magnitude at a distance of 10 parsecs).
>      ''
>   8.  absolute (1914) A. Eaglefield Hull Mod. Harmony iv. 51 ``If
>      the possession of the sense of absolute pitch is a sine qu.
>      non for the proper reception of such music, then the circle of
>      appreciation at present is narrowed down almost to
>      vanishing-point. ''
>   9.  absolutely(1914) W. L. George Making of an Englishman iii. v.
>      299 ``Oh, don'tcher care, it's all over, absoballylutely. ''
>  10.  absorption(1914) Rep. Brit. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 1913 607 (title)
>      ``Atmospheric Refraction and Absorption as affecting
>      Transmission in Wireless Telegraphy. ''
>  11.  abstractio(1914) F. H. Bradley Ess. Truth &. Reality 143
>      ``Prof. James, in Pragmatism..insists..on taking the crime in
>      its abstraction as absolutely real. And then he goes on (Hegel
>      would have smiled) to denounce `abstractionism'.''
>  12.  abusefully(1914) Kipling Divers. of Creatures (1917) 53
>      ``Talkin' most abusefully.''
>  13.  accommodat(1914) I. Hay Knight on Wheels i. i. 13 ``A small
>      green&dubh.grocer's shop-an `accommodation address' of the most
>      ordinary type-whose proprietor admitted that he was in the
>      habit of taking in letters on behalf of some of his customers.
>      ''
>  14.  accrete (1914) G. B. Shaw Common Sense about War 11 ``He, too,
>      accreted fools and knaves, and ended defeated in St. Helena. ''
>  15.  achalasia (1914) A. F. Hertz [= A. F. Hurst] in Q. Jrnl. Med.
>      VIII. 300 ``Achalasia of the Cardia (so-called..Cardiospasm)...
>      For the word `achalasia' I am indebted to Sir Cooper Perry, who
>      coined it for me, as it was obvious that the word `cardiospasm'
>      and the erroneous idea it conveys would never be discarded
>      unless some less cumbersome expression..was devised. ''
>  16.  acid (1914) Lancet 28 Mar. 908/1 ``The air of New York schools
>      was examined for the acid-forming streptococci. ''
>  17.  acidaemia (1914) N.Y. Med. Jrnl. XCIX. 987/2 (title) ``Alcohol
>      acidemia. ''
>  18.  action (1914) J. B. Rathbun Motion Picture Making iii. 68 ``At
>      the word `Ready', given by the producer, the camera man starts
>      cranking the machine and the actors stand alert... An instant
>      after follows the order, `Start your action'. ''
>  19.  action (1914) Amer. Jrnl. Physiol. XXXIV. 425 ``The
>      action-current is the only known change accompanying excitation
>      in nerve which is competent to stimulate an adjoining nerve. ''
>  20.  action (1914) B. Ramsay Diary 25 Aug. in W. S. Chalmers Full
>      Cycle (1959) 20 ``On being asked why he was not at his *action
>      station, the marine replied..that he was `duty servant'. ''
>  21.  Adam (1914) H. A. Vachell Quinneys' iv. §.1, ``The
>      sweetest table, genuine Adam. ''
>  22.  adjunct (1914) O. Jespersen Mod. Eng. Gram. II. i. 2 ``In the
>      combination extremely hot weather..hot, which defines weather,
>      is a secondary word or an adjunct. ''
>  23.  Admiraliss(1914) Prince Louis of Battenberg Let. 27 Aug. in M.
>      Gilbert Winston S. Churchill (1971) III. Compan. I. 63 ``Your
>      general dispositions and the measures taken by you from July
>      27th until you handed over the Command in the Mediterranean to
>      the French Admiralissimo are fully approved by Their Lordships.
>      ''
>  24.  admiralty (1914) Coal &. Iron 11 May 709/2 ``For best
>      Admiralities up to 20s. is still being quoted. ''
>  25.  adsorb (1914) Chem. Abstr. VIII. 2845 ``The displacement of
>      one adsorbable substance by another possessing this property to
>      a high degree. ''
>  26.  adviser (1914) V. L. Collins Princeton 376 ``Each [first-year
>      student] has an `adviser' among the younger members of the
>      faculty to whom he is encouraged to go with all or any of his
>      perplexities. ''
>  27.  adzuki (1914) Bull. U.S. Dept. Agric. No. 119. 4 ``The adsuki
>      is probably native either in Japan or in Chosen [=Korea], but
>      the plant is not definitely known in a wild state. ''
>  28.  adzuki (1914) Bull. U.S. Dept. Agric., No. 119. 4 ``The adsuki
>      bean is a summer annual. ''
>  29.  aerial (1914) Hamel &. Turner Flying xvi. 280 ``The *aerial
>      observation officer must be highly trained... Nothing appears
>      yet to have been done towards making staff officers capable of
>      taking aerial observations. ''
>  30.  aerial (1914) R.F.C. Training Man. 11. 22 ``*Aerial
>      reconnaissance..may be considered under three heads:
>      strategical, tactical and protective. ''
>  31.  aerofoil (1914) Aeronaut. Jrnl. XVIII. 315 ``Aerofoil, a
>      structure, analogous to the wing or tail of a bird, designed to
>      obtain a reaction from the air approximately at right angles to
>      the direction of its motion. ''
>  32.  aeroplane (1914) Lancet 4 July 55/1 ``A special aeroplane
>      constructed to accommodate, besides the aviator, a medical man
>      and also a covered litter on which the wounded man can be
>      placed for transport... This aeroplane ambulance [etc.]. ''
>  33.  aeroplane (1914) G. B. Shaw Misalliance 46 ``Lina. I never
>      drink tea. Tarleton. Bad thing to aeroplane on, I should
>      imagine. ''
>  34.  aesthete (1914) C. Mackenzie Sinister Street II. iii. i. 516
>      ``My dear chap, he was absolutely barred. M' tutor used to like
>      him, but..I don't mind telling you, he's really an
>      &ae.sthete.''
>  35.  affiliatio(1914) Act 4 &. 5 Geo. V c. 6 §. 7 ``In this
>      Act..the expression `affiliation order' means an order made
>      under the Bastardy Laws Amendment Act, 1872..adjudging a man to
>      be the putative father of a bastard child and ordering him to
>      pay a sum of money weekly or otherwise to the mother of the
>      bastard child or to any other person who is named in the order.
>      ''
>  36.  Afro- (1914) Lancet 4 Apr. 966/2 ``An *Afro-Aryan child aged 3
>      years, the offspring of a male African negro and a female
>      Cingalese. ''
>  37.  after- (1914) J. Collings Colon. Rur. Brit. I. vi. 113 ``The
>      remainder of the children whose after-school career was traced
>      went into industrial or commercial occupations. ''
>  38.  afterthoug(1914) G. B. Shaw Misalliance 3 ``Have you ever
>      considered the fact that I was an afterthought?.. My father was
>      44 when I was born. My mother was 41. There was twelve years
>      between me and the next eldest. ''
>  39.  ago (1914) W. Owen Let. 19 July (1967) 267 ``So you are at
>      last getting the Curtains, about which we fidaddled so long a
>      year &. more agone! ''
>  40.  agon (1914) F. M. Cornford Origin Attic Comedy i. 2 ``What is
>      now generally called the Agon, a fierce `contest' between the
>      representatives of two parties or principles, which are in
>      effect the hero and villain of the whole piece. ''
>  41.  agonist (1914) F. M. Cornford Origin Attic Comedy v. 71
>      ``Three, or sometimes four, r.les are involved in the Agon...
>      First there are the two Adversaries (as we shall call them).
>      For the sake of convenience, we shall distinguish them as the
>      `Agonist' and the `Antagonist'. The Agonist is the hero, who is
>      attacked, is put on his defence, and comes off victorious. ''
>  42.  ain't (1914) Dialect Notes IV. 70 ``He ain't got sense enough
>      to carry guts to a bear. ''
>  43.  aioli (1914) A. E. Housman Let. 2 May (1971) 134 ``Aioli at
>      Pascal's was rather nasty, perhaps because lukewarm. ''
>  44.  air (1914) E. A. Powell Fighting in Flanders iii. 73 ``The
>      Lewis gun..is air-cooled. ''
>  45.  air (1914) H. Brearley Case-Hardening of Steel vi. 72 ``The
>      surface of the *air-hardened steel is less hard than that of
>      water or oil quenched steel. ''
>  46.  air (1914) Sphere 26 Dec. 318/1 ``The possible air attack over
>      London. ''
>  47.  air (1914) Sci. Amer. 15 Aug. 113/2 (heading) ``The Air Bomb.
>      ''
>  48.  air (1914) Sci. Amer. 15 Aug. 114/1 ``The aerial mine is
>      inferior to the sea-mine not only in its vulnerability to
>      currents, but also in its visibility...Against..these handicaps
>      the air-mine can oppose only its cheapness and lightness. ''
>  49.  air (1914) Times 24 June 4/1 ``The Royal Naval Air
>      Service..will form part of the Military Branch of the Royal
>      Navy... A certain number [of officers] will..be selected to
>      fill the higher posts in the Air Service. ''
>  50.  air (1914) Illustr. War News 19 Aug. 43 (caption) ``The value
>      of the air-scout: military entrenching viewed by an airman from
>      a height of about 1000 feet. ''
>  51.  air (1914) Sphere 3 Oct. p. ii, ``One of these dismantled air
>      scouts. ''
>  52.  air (1914) Aeronaut. Jrnl. July 228 ``Air brakes..must not
>      tend to produce any upsetting effect on the machine. ''
>  53.  air (1914) Aeronaut. Jrnl. XVIII. 315 ``Airscrew, used as a
>      generic term to include both a propellor and a tractor screw.
>      ''
>  54.  air (1914) Whitaker's Almanack 1915 774 ``Fort George
>      (Cromarty Firth).-British Naval Air Station. ''
>  55.  air-line (1914) Argus (Melbourne) 16 July 13 ``The Defence
>      flying school at Point Cook has been inaccessible..except by
>      air line. ''
>  56.  air-raid (1914) Whitaker's Almanack 1915 823/1 ``British air
>      raids on Cologne and Dusseldorf. ''
>  57.  a la carte(1914) I. Hay Lighter Side School Life vii. 189 ``If
>      you want to have your son educated . la carte, you must get a
>      private tutor for him. ''
>  58.  Algerian (1914) M. D. Stott Real Algeria iii. 41 ``The
>      Algerian regards his own intelligence and aptitude in every
>      respect superior to that of the Frenchman.''
>  59.  algraphy (1914) E. H. Richter Prints 10 ``Plates of metal are
>      often substituted for stone (zincography, algraphy).''
>  60.  alighting (1914) Aeronaut. Jrnl. XVIII. 315 ``Carriage, that
>      part of the aircraft..intended..to absorb the shock of
>      alighting. ''
>  61.  all (1914) I. Hay Knight on Wheels xix. 192 ``Most of them are
>      Impossibles, but there are a good many All-Buts. ''
>  62.  allelomorp(1914) T. H. Morgan in Amer. Naturalist XLVIII. 502
>      (title) ``The theoretical distinction between multiple
>      allelomorphs and close linkage. ''
>  63.  allelomorp(1914) T. H. Morgan in Amer. Naturalist XLVIII. 502
>      (title, ) ``Dexter pointed out that the mode of treatment that
>      Nabours followed..is the procedure of multiple allelomorphism.
>      ''
>  64.  alley (1914) E. Pound in Blast i. 50 ``For her laughter
>      frightens even the street hawker And the alley cat dies of a
>      migraine. ''
>  65.  all round (1914) W. E. Beet Mediaeval Papacy ii. 43 ``The most
>      striking feature of Gregory's character and work was its
>      all-roundness. ''
>  66.  ally (1914) Times 2 Nov. 9/6 ``A Note was to have been
>      presented to the Porte on Friday asking for..the withdrawal of
>      the German officers and men from the Turkish ships [etc.]...
>      Failing satisfaction in these respects, diplomatic relations
>      with the Allies would cease. ''
>  67.  aloha (1914) R. Brooke Let. Mar. (1968) 566 ``The anchor's up
>      &. the folk on shore sing `Good-bye, my flenni!' or `Aloha oe!'
>      ''
>  68.  alpenrose (1914) Gardening Illustr. 24 Jan. 49/2 ``R. hirsutum
>      had disappeared while R. ferrugineum was abundant... They are
>      the two varieties of the well-known Swiss Alpenrose, which
>      looks handsome in large sheets of colour. ''
>  69.  alpha (1914) W. Rosenhain Physical Metallurgy viii. 167 ``Iron
>      is capable of existing in at least three diverse or
>      `allotropic' conditions. These are generally known as the
>      &gamma., &beta. and &alpha. forms of iron. ''
>  70.  altiplano (1914) B. Miall tr. Walle's Bolivia ii. 45 ``Those
>      who should judge Bolivia only by the altoplano [sic]..would
>      form a melancholy idea of the country. ''
>  71.  amentia (1914) A. F. Tredgold Mental Deficiency (Amentia) (ed.
>      2) xiii. 226 ``Secondary Amentia and its Clinical Varieties.
>      Toxic, Inflammatory and Vascular Amentia. ''
>  72.  amentia (1914) A. F. Tredgold Mental Deficiency (Amentia 228
>      )``The fact that the onset of these cases is so often attended
>      with convulsions causes them to be frequently designated
>      `epileptic' or `eclampsic' amentia.''
>  73.  American (1914) Maclean's Mag. June 109/3 ``Windsor
>      Hotel..Rates: American Plan, &dollar.1.50-&dollar.2.50.
>      European Plan, 75c. to &dollar.1.50. ''
>  74.  Amorite (1914) T. E. Lawrence Let. 6 Feb. (1938) 165 ``We are
>      digging up well preserved Amorites who were buried naked and
>      headless. ''
>  75.  amount (1914) M. Sinclair Three Sisters lxiii. 369 ``And he
>      had spent any amount of money on it. ''
>  76.  Ampelopsis(1914) Compton Mackenzie Sinister Street iii. vii.
>      646 ``The tea&dubh.tray gothic of Balliol, and Trinity with its
>      municipal ampelopsis. ''
>  77.  amplifier (1914) Electrician 12 June 402/2 ``After developing
>      the Audion as detector, amplifier and oscillator, Dr. Lee de
>      Forest has recently described..the small-sized 312 volt
>      amplifier bulb. ''
>  78.  anaerobe (1914) G. B. Shaw Misalliance 15 ``There was a
>      regular terror of a countess with an anaerobic system [of
>      drainage]. ''
>  79.  anaesthesi(1914) Stedman's Med. Dict. 46/1 ``Anesthesiology.
>      ''
>  80.  analphabet(1914) N.Y. Times Current History 12 Dec. 79 ``There
>      are no analphabets to be found among them. ''
>  81.  analyst (1914) Eder &. Moltzer tr. Jung's Theory
>      Psychoanalysis in Psychoanal. Rev. I. 425 ``Transference to,
>      and dependence upon the analyst could be considered as a
>      sufficient end, with a definite therapeutic effect, if the
>      analyst were in every respect a great personality, capable..to
>      guide the patients. ''
>  82.  anamorphic(1904), (1914) [see anamorphism 3].
>  83.  anamorphis(1914) Ries &. Watson Engin. Geol. iii. 204
>      ``Anamorphic zone. The zone of anamorphism corresponds to the
>      zone of flowage, in which there is great pressure in all
>      directions. It is a zone of reconstruction, and is especially
>      characterized by silication involving decarbonation,
>      dehydration, and deoxidation.''
>  84.  anaphoric (1914) Jespersen Mod. Eng. Gram. II. i. x. 247, ``I
>      propose to apply the word anaphoric to one (or any other word)
>      if it refers to some word already mentioned, while I say
>      independent if there is no such contextual reference. ''
>  85.  anaphorica(1914) Jespersen Mod. Eng. Gram. II. i. x. 247 ``The
>      little one is used anaphorically if it means `the little
>      flower' or whatever it is that has just been mentioned. ''
>  86.  anchorless(1914) R. Brooke Let. 7 Mar. in Coll. Poems (1929)
>      p. cxii, ``I really do feel a little anchorless. I shall be
>      glad to be back among you all, and tied to somewhere in
>      England. ''
>  87.  and (1914) S. A. Hirsch in A. G. Little R. Bacon v. 128
>      ``Another large portion of the Greek Grammar is taken up by
>      Bacon's treatment of accentuation and prosody (pp. 95-144), and
>      no wonder! ''
>  88.  andradite (1914) Brit. Mus. Return 227 ``Garnet (andradite)
>      from China.''
>  89.  androconiu(1914) T. B. Fletcher Some Indian Insects v. 49
>      ``The flocculent yellow androconial hairs which line the
>      interior of the pocket and which doubtless emit a smell
>      attractive to the female. ''
>  90.  angleberry(1914) P. MacGill Children of Dead End vi. 32 ``One
>      of the horses was spavined and the other was covered with
>      angle-berries.''
>  91.  antecede (1914) C. A. Mercier Astrol. in Med. 1 ``Its origin
>      is so remote as to antecede all written records.''
>  92.  ante-post (1914) Daily Express 19 Sept. 5/2 ``If there had
>      been any important ante-post betting..many would have burnt
>      their fingers badly.''
>  93.  antevert (1914) N. Amer. Rev. Sept. 387 ``The Cossacks..rode
>      down the sidewalks..in an effort to antevert a meeting of the
>      students.''
>  94.  anthocyani(1914) Chem. Abstr. 335 ``The anthocyanidin
>      reaction..consists in extg. the fresh plant material. ''
>  95.  anthocyani(1914) Proc. R. Soc. B. LXXXVII. 444 ``In no case
>      could any trace of antho&dubh.cyanidin be found. ''
>  96.  anthroposo(1914) tr. Steiner's Spiritual Sci. 26 ``This
>      building will be for the use of the Anthroposophical Society.
>      ''
>  97.  anti- (1914) Domville-Fife Submarines, Mines &. Torpedoes ix,
>      (heading) ``Anti-Submarine Tactics. ''
>  98.  anti-aircr(1914) Scotsman 25 Sept. 5/4 ``An anti-aircraft gun
>      of the Third Army Corps. ''
>  99.  anti-clock(1914) Domville-Fife Submarines, Mines &. Torpedoes
>      163 ``A tiny three or four-cylinder engine which operates twin
>      screws, moving `clock-wise' and `anti-clockwise'. ''
> 100.  antimacass(1914) Times 13 May 11/5 ``The antimacassared ease
>      of early Victorian times may have been too much of a good
>      thing, but that was better than the excesses of the modern
>      athletic girl. ''